Low Back Pain: The big picture

End Low Back Pain

End Low Back Pain

Low back pain is a common, almost universal complaint. At some point in life almost everyone has experienced this problem. Some unfortunate people are plagued with a chronic condition that continues despite medication, treatment, and expensive mattresses. Americans spend at least $50 BILLION each year on low back pain. It is the most common cause of job-related disability and a leading contributor to missed work. Low back pain follows headache as the second neurological ailment reported in the United States. Here at Synergy Healthcare we have effective treatments for this universal ailment.

Most acute low back pain is mechanical in nature, owing to trauma, overuse, or incorrect use of the musculoskeletal system. Symptoms can range from restricted range-of-motion, muscle ache, or stabbing pain to the inability to come to upright standing. If not remedied, this can lead to chronic pain that is more difficult to deal with. Synergy Healthcare has multiple therapies geared toward addressing low back pain, including: Strain Counterstrain, Myofascial Release, Feldenkrais, Total Motion Release, Craniosacral Therapy, Total Body Balancing, and Lymphatic Drainage.

The low back area is similar to a complex freeway interchange in a major city. It houses and protects the internal communication and electrical systems of the body, transfers gravitational, load bearing, and shear forces. It mechanically articulates with other structural components of the skeleton for movement and support, allows transport of fluids (blood, lymph and wastes), and protects internal organs. All this activity takes place in one of the most structurally vulnerable places in the human body. When the low back is dysfunctional, it can affect many of the body’s functions.

Skeletally, the low back is made up of the lumbar vertebral bodies attached superior to the sacrum and pelvis and inferior to the thoracic spine & ribs. These 5 bones not only stack on one another to support the weight of the upper body but also house the spinal cord that innervates the lower body. Between each of these bones are gelatinous intervertebral disks that act as shock absorbers and allow movement.

A unique therapy offered at Synergy is the Feldenkrais Method, based on the work of Moshe Feldenkrais, D.Sc. A form of somatic education, it focuses on the skeletal system and uses gentle movement and directed attention to improve movement. It is based on the principles of physics, biomechanics, and human development. We offer group lessons called “Awareness Through Movement” as well as individual sessions called “Functional Integration”. These address functional movement, posture, and unnecessary habitual patterns that relate to the whole body.

Many muscles are involved in the low back region including: latissimus dorsi, external obliques, serratus posterior inferior, longissimus thoracis, multifidus, spinalis thoracis, transversus abdominis, internal obliques, quadratus lumborum and psoas major. And these are just the tip of the iceberg, so-to-speak. Each of these muscles attach to other structures via ligaments that can all have their own mis-alignments and dysfunctions.

One of the manual therapies utilized at Synergy Healthcare is Myofascial Release, MFR. Fascia is a thin, tough, elastic connective tissue that wraps around all the organs, muscles, and structures of the body. It can become restricted due to trauma, overuse, injury, scar tissue, muscle tension, diminished blood flow, or inactivity. Often the result is pain. The therapist locates restricted areas of movement and then directly or indirectly manipulates the fascia to regain mobility.

We all know that low back pain does not exist in a vacuum. The human body is a whole entity, where each part affects all the other parts. The place where pain or symptoms present themselves is not always where the dysfunction or primary problem exists. Treating just the symptom “low back pain” will not necessarily cure the root problem. We make an effort to observe and treat the “whole” person. It might be a leg length problem, a knee or ankle problem or even a digestive issues contributing to the issues at hand.

Some of the therapists at Synergy have been trained in Total Body Balancing, TBB. This technique is based on the work of John Wenham D. O. It assesses and treats the whole body with the use of long levers and rhythmic mobilization to release tension in the muscles, fascia, joint capsules, and ligaments to improve circulation, and arterial, venous, and lymphatic flow. It helps to normalize sympathetic and parasympathetic neurological activity, and improves global systemic vitality. TBB influences all systems of the body including lymphatic, visceral, myofascial, and musculoskeletal systems.

Total Motion Release, TMR, is an effective therapy used in treating low back pain. It allows the therapist to evaluate and then treat the patient by identifying movement imbalances. The therapist first evaluates the patient in the office and then gives them a simple, easy-to-follow home exercise program designed to address imbalance throughout the whole body. It is unique because it focuses on utilizing the strong side to remedy imbalances on the weak side. This leads to a more symmetrical presentation, which ultimately leads to less pain.

Chronic pain, pain lasting more than 6 months, can originate with an initial trauma or injury but persists long after the injury heals. Prolonged pain leads to anxiety, stress, depression, and fatigue that may interact with the body’s production of natural painkillers. These negative feelings may increase the level of substances that amplify sensations of pain, causing a vicious cycle of pain. There is evidence that unrelenting pain can suppress the immune system.

One of the most widely used treatments for chronic pain at Synergy is Strain Counterstrain, SCS. This technique is a type of “passive positional release” created by Lawrence Jones D.O. It is a manual therapy that alleviates muscle and connective tissue tightness in a gentle and non-traumatic way. During a treatment, the involved tissue is put “on slack” enabling aberrant reflexes that produce muscle spasms to relax. In most cases, it has almost immediate effects on reducing pain and swelling while improving mobility.

Lastly, specific visceral restriction can be the cause of low back pain including chronic constipation and diarrhea, reflux and surgical scar adhesions from laparoscopic or other major surgeries.

Overall, Synergy Healthcare has many treatment options for people that suffer from low back pain. If you have a patient that has not gotten results from traditional physical therapy for their pain, please consider referring them to Synergy Healthcare, where we treat our patients as a whole, well-balanced person, not just a symptom or disease.

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Are your headaches not getting better?

Headache treatment at Synergy.

Headache treatment at Synergy.

I thought you might find it interesting to know how we specifically look at headache management. Synergy is known for treating patients with complex headache issues, and you might not know that.  These are the main areas we look at: history of falls, trauma/injuries throughout the whole body, nutrition (food sensitivities),  sleep, sleep postures, birth history, positional and occupational habits and recreational and hobby postures.

When treating headaches that are not cranial-trauma induced, it is necessary to take into account posture when sitting, standing and in supine.  A person’s posture is developed from habit, occupational and recreational repetitive activities, emotional strain, and injuries. So determining the history of falls, especially hard falls on the coccyx, sacrum or ischial tuberosities is very important.   The reason whysuboccipital muscles this information is useful is the nature of the pelvis, vertebral column, and base of the skull. Falls can lead to pubic bone, sacroiliac, and lumbosacral joint problems. The tendinous insertion problems can result in asymmetries that then lead to imbalanced muscle firing. This imbalance in muscular firing can wreak havoc throughout the spine.

 

Imagine it happening to the tiny muscles up through the spine. These muscles have the capacity to shift and change over and over throughout the day and night.  Studies show that they fire before any motion actually happens in preparation to protect the spine, however if a few of them are in the contracted short or elongated position,  other muscles will have to accommodate for them. This is generally not a problem, but what if they can’t accommodate anymore? Such as in permanent arthritic changes, surgery, disc damage, or a whiplash injury.

 

It then becomes imperative to give the body as much accommodation as possible in the available structures. Problems low down can contribute to headaches and pain syndromes along with myriad other complaints.

So how we treat is not as important as why we treat the way we do.  What is the rationale for the process that we use?
1.Removing edema and improving venous drainage through lymphatic drainage therapy, manual lymphatic massage, strain counterstrain venous/lymphatic  techniques, or total body balancing  (old Osteopathic global body treatment)  is generally the first approach.  We have many techniques to improve fluidic flow through the thoracic inlet.
2. Bone and ligament restrictions need to be addressed. We also check for spring in the rib cage. If that entire area is rigid and fixed, it can lead to all sorts of mischief.
3.  Next, we look at muscular and fascial restriction.   Whatever cervical musculature is in spasm can be relieved through lymphatic techniques, myofascial release or strain counterstrain.
4. We can determine specific arteries, veins, or nerves that are causing dysfunction and free them up.

Motion is first priority, then alignment through structural mobilization and then finally
strengthening with the body in a balanced position.

Once the pelvis, thoracic and cervical spine influences to the cranium have been reduced, I will utilize craniosacral therapy techniques to specifically mobilize local structures that continue to be drivers of the pain/symptoms.  These techniques are best suited to patients with post concussive syndrome, traumatic brain injury, vertigo, trigeminal neuralgia, Bell’s palsy, vision and auditory problems, (structurally based) birth trauma including colic, torticollis (jugular foramen compression) and myriad other specific cranial issues.

Lastly, I utilize progressive relaxation techniques to teach patients how to let go of muscle tension that they might not be aware of and review postures that might be contributing to maintaining dysfunctional patterns.

Vitality, mobility and position are the tenants of the clinic. Hope you enjoyed the leisurely walk through my thinking process.  

Sometimes a headache isn’t just a headache.

 

If you would like to read the full version the link is here. Link here to an article we sent to doctors.

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Shauna upside down and out of the box

 

 

Best,

Shauna Burchett OTR/L owner

 

 

 

 

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Are your headache patients not getting better?

I thought you might find it interesting to know how we specifically look at headache management for your patients.  Synergy is known for treating patients with complex cervicocephalic issues, and you might not know that.  These are the main areas we look at: history of falls, trauma/injuries throughout the whole body, nutrition (food sensitivities),  sleep, sleep postures, birth history, positional and occupational habits and recreational and hobby postures.

When treating headaches that are not cranial-trauma induced, it is necessary to take into account posture when sitting, standing and in supine.  A person’s posture is developed from habit, occupational and recreational repetitive activities, emotional strain, and injuries. So determining the history of falls, especially hard falls on the coccyx, sacrum or ischial tuberosities is very important.   The reason why this information is useful is the nature of the pelvis, vertebral column, dural attachments in the suboccipital region, anterior and posterior longitudinal ligaments and nuchal ligament.   Any kind of trauma to the bone can lead to an intraosseous or interosseous lesion of the bone(s) in question.  Falls can lead to pubic bone, sacroiliac, and lumbosacral joint dysfunction.  These falls can cause a direct biomechanical problem or a more subtle change to the periosteum and then the attachment of tendons. The tendinous insertion dysfunction can result in asymmetries that then lead to imbalanced muscle firing. This imbalance in muscular firing can wreak havoc throughout the spine.

suboccipital musclesImagine it happening with the small Rectus Capitis posterior minor/major muscles as they attach to the occiput, C1,  and through a myodural bridge directly to the cervical dura. Hyperflexion extension injuries activate Rectus Capitus major /minor and Obliquus Capitus superior/inferior muscles and convey  forces through the attachment to the cervical dura. Studies show that links between the suboccipital musculature, fascia, and cervical dura mater have involvement  in cervicocephalic pain syndromes, sensorimotor activity, and postural regulation. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4025088/

Imagine it happening to the tiny multifidi muscles up through the spine. These muscles have the capacity to shift and change over and over throughout the day and night.  Studies show that they fire before any motion actually happens in preparation to protect the spine, however if a few of them are in the contracted short or elongated position,  other muscles will have to accommodate for them. This is generally not a problem, but what if they can’t accommodate anymore? Such as in permanent arthritic changes, surgery, disc damage, or a high velocity injury.

It then becomes imperative to give the body as much accommodation as possible in the available structures. Dysfunction low down on the kinetic chain can contribute to cervicocephalic headaches and pain syndromes along with myriad other complaints.

Aggressive treatment of the dural tube, the intraosseous and interosseous lesions in the sacrum, ilium, ischium and the pelvic floor to give as much ability to move in the pelvis, will invariably give the vertebral column room to move. More motion provides more motion. Give a little bit of motion in a lot of places translates to a lot of motion overall, versus focusing on the one area which doesn’t move. This is very common with new practitioners. The suboccipital region is tight and patients say that their headaches come from that spot. Practitioners do everything in that area, ice, heat, estim, vertebral mobilization, massage.  Patients get some relief,  but it often comes back eventually because the therapist didn’t find the source of the dysfunction. Finding the source that is driving that dysfunction is a much more global approach, it may take longer, but it also can be more permanent. Often times, headaches are as a result of lack of mobility in a certain area of the spine or pelvis.

So how we treat is not as important as why we treat the way we do.  What is the rationale for the process that we use?

1. Removing edema and improving venous drainage through lymphatic drainage therapy, manual lymphatic massage, strain counterstrain venous/lymphatic  techniques, or total body balancing  (old Osteopathic global body treatment)  is generally the first approach.  We have many techniques to improve fluidic flow through the thoracic inlet.

2. Osseous and ligamentous restrictions need to be addressed (clavicular mobilization sternoclavicular and costoclavicular mobilization, including first rib and C7-T1 junction) and all of the associated ligaments. We also check for spring in the rib cage. If that entire area is rigid and fixed, it can lead to all sorts of mischief.

3. Next, we look at muscular and fascial restriction.   Whatever cervical musculature is in spasm can be relieved through lymphatic techniques, myofascial release or strain counterstrain.

4. We can determine specific arteries, veins, or nerves that are causing dysfunction and free them up.

For example, if someone has a Sternocleidomastoid chronic hypertonicity, we are going to evaluate the sternal, clavicular and mastoid attachments  and see if there is rigidity, edema, heat or fibrosity.  All of those symptoms reveal some sort of causality. We need to get fluid to flow to reduce hypertonicity. Jugulodigastric, anterior cervical and supraclavicular lymph needs to flow really well for ultimate healing to occur.  Ligamentous hydration is addressed through oscillatory techniques.   Fascial and muscular mobilization and stretching may be indicated, however we now know that compression of a structure is much more effective to provide long term change.  Taking a region into ease is much less stimulating to the nervous system which promotes parasympathetic  tone. Overall healing only happens in heightened parasympathetic tone.

Motion is first priority, then alignment through structural mobilization and then finally strengthening with the body in a balanced position.

We want to increase vitality in all of the structures treated. What is vitality? It is the inherent health of the tissues. Tissues on a 60-year-old smoker is much different than an organic eating 30-year-old athlete. Restoring vitality to the bones, increasing their hydration and capacity for hydration, changes the nature of the periosteum, thereby changing the tendinous attachments, thereby changing the ability, and perhaps even make up, of the muscle fibers from static to more dynamic.

It is very necessary to ensure that dura is moving as well as it can, especially in the upper cervical region.   Direct mobilization is necessary with prolonged gentle force to make a change, because it is one tough mother, if you will.

Anterior longitudinal ligament and nuchal ligament mobilization in the cervical spine will improve cervical lordosis. As we age and have trauma and falls, the curves in our spine can change leading to a more flattened curve in the lumbar, thoracic and cervical region thus

displacing the forces of gravity and shifting them into a less energy conservative manner. As energy is expended to keep the head in neutral position and the eyes level with the horizon, muscles can splint into place and shorten posteriorly and lengthen anteriorly, especially in the neck. The contracted nuchal ligament  can lead to degenerative changes in the spine. If the curves are maintained throughout life, the less chance of degenerative changes, especially at C5-6 and L4-L5,L5-S1, the most common areas for the discs to wear out.  Optimal organ function and fluidic exchange is also tied to maintaining the curves.

Once the pelvis, thoracic and cervical spine influences to the cranium have been reduced, I will utilize craniosacral therapy techniques to specifically mobilize local structures that continue to be drivers of the pain/symptoms. These techniques are best suited to patients with post concussive syndrome, traumatic brain injury, vertigo, trigeminal neuralgia, Bell’s palsy, vision and auditory problems, (structurally based) birth trauma including colic, torticollis (jugular foramen compression) and myriad other specific cranial issues.

 

On the first or second visit I start to implement an exercise routine to give patients control over their own care and build body awareness. The one that I’ve most recently fallen in love with is called Total Motion Release. Otherwise known as TMR in our clinic. It’s a balancing technique, not a strengthening one because I’ve learned over time that pain is a result of imbalance. Perhaps in a joint, throughout the spine, various offending musculature regions, or intraosseous driven. It really doesn’t matter. Total Motion Release directs the patient to treat the good side, and by some weird neurological quirk, it fixes an imbalance in the body.

Try it. This is the participation part of the article- I know you didn’t expect this, bare with me, no one is watching you, well maybe they are,  but be a rebel. Put your feet squarely on the floor, sit forward on the edge of the chair. Put your hands on your stomach, Twist to the right and look over your shoulder, then twist to the left and look over that shoulder. Test and see which way goes further, has greater ease, and no pain. Then twist that way (the good way) for 20 seconds, two times and then reevaluate (make sure you make it count, don’t be whimpy- push it). Your twists should be more symmetrical when you check right versus left.  You might need to do it two, three or four times to get them even but eventually they will be, unless you have some sort of structural issue that needs treatment from someone like me. Balance leads to less pain.

Lastly, I utilize progressive relaxation techniques to teach patients how to let go of muscle tension that they might not be aware of and review postures that might be contributing to maintaining dysfunctional patterns.

Vitality, mobility and position are the tenants of the clinic. Hope you enjoyed the leisurely walk through my thinking process.  Sometimes a headache isn’t just a headache.


Best,

Shauna Burchett OTR/L owner

 

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Strain Counterstrain for Chronic Pain

This article was send from the Jones institute in April 2014 and written by an instructor that we have come to respect- Brian Tuckey PT, OCS, JSCCI.  We thought you might enjoy it.
Fascial Counterstrain for Chronic Lumbo-Pelvic Pain

Case study – “Liz” -Testimonial :“I had been in severe pain for 6 months prior to seeing Brian. I had been to 8 different doctors including two chiropractors, a physical therapist, two orthopedic physicians and a pain management doctor. I had seventy appointments (treatments) throughout the six months trying to figure out what was wrong with me and to just get temporary pain relief. No traditional doctor could find anything wrong. After the first visit with Brian I received an immense amount of pain relief. I walked out of his office so emotional and happy because I just knew that this man knew what he was doing. His sense and knowledge of the human body and how everything works together is truly amazing. Now after just ten visits with Brian (Fascial Counterstrain,) I’m a happy, smiling, active and pain free 28 year old woman…”

History: 28 year old white female runner, who after experiencing months of left groin and pelvic discomfort while exercising, awoke following intercourse, with severe debilitating pain.

Symptoms: Liz’s symptoms included left lumbosacral, groin and lower extremity pain extending as far as the left foot. Her pain was described as constant, rated 5-10/10 based on attempted activity level. She also reported the presence of a “cyst” like structure on her left hip that appeared sometime following the onset of her hip pain. Lastly, her left foot frequently turned “purple” and would throb causing resting discomfort and sleep disturbance.

Function: Pain limited her ability to walk, sit prolonged, sleep, participate in sexual activity and sleep undisturbed. She was also unable to participate in any recreational activities.

Evaluation: Left hip AROM was 50% limited in abduction and extension due to groin pain. Palpation demonstrated significant dysfunction present in the arterial, neural and lymphatic systems with the majority of the dysfunction identified in the left lower extremity and lumbo-pelvic region.

First Treatment: Fascial Counterstrain (FCS) was performed to the left uterine artery, rectal artery, superior / inferior mesenteric arteries, and the Obturator nerve. She experienced 2 days of complete pain relief until seeing her chiropractor for the last time, who aggravated her pain resulting in her reporting a net 70% improvement after the initial FCS treatment. She also reported that the frequency of her feet turning purple had significantly decreased.

Subsequent treatments: The next five sessions focused on alleviating the remaining dysfunction in her body including a number of lymphatic tender points identified in the left hip and lower extremity. Soon after, Liz reported that the “cyst” in her left hip had disappeared. Following the 5th session she was fully recovered & discharged from care for her lower quarter (original complaint.) Later, an additional 5 sessions of FCS were performed to address unrelated cervico-thoracic and cranial dysfunction.

This case study emphasizes the fact that training in Fascial Counterstrain will allow you to identify and correct not only musculoskeletal, but also, non- musculoskeletal pain syndromes.

-Brian Tuckey PT, OCS, JSCCI

 

 

Synergy Healthcare in Spokane has one Occupational therapy  and four Physical therapy clinicians who utilize strain counterstrain and have training from this teacher, Arch Harrison PTA is certified and Becky Clark PT has taken almost every course available through the Jones institute.

 

 

 

 

 

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Physical therapy for WHIPLASH in Spokane at Synergy Healthcare.

Whiplash treatment at Synergy

Whiplash treatment at Synergy Healthcare

Whiplash is very well known but not very well understood. It’s actually not one specific condition at all. Considering it a disorder would be more appropriate. It is a vague term meaning some form of dysfunction of the neck, head, arms or upper extremities. Whiplash occurs after a traumatic incident when the head is suddenly accelerated or decelerated without the body coming along. For example in a car accident your trunk and lower extremities are held in place by the seat belt but your head is unsecured. A properly situated head rest will remedy a lot of this stabilization if the head is whipped backwards. This sudden movement does involve the whole body not just the neck and head.

One of the most confusing aspects of whiplash is the fact that sometimes the symptoms do not show up for hours, days, weeks and even months. Also not understood is what is affected by the whiplash. Injuries are limited to muscles but can damage ligaments, fascia, facet joints, intervertebral discs, or compress the vascular structures of the neck.

Treatments to help reduce pain and increase range of motion differ as most are focused only on the muscles and tendons while over looking the more complex structures. One commonly overlooked problem is overstretched vascular structures. There is some laxity in the blood vessels but the stretch is limited to the normal range of motion of the neck. With a high speed incident the body is pushed beyond it’s normal range of motion which causes the body, through it’s stretch receptors, to tighten down the vessels and fascial layers in order to protect them. Pain from tightened fascia and compressed blood vessels is different than that of a tight muscle. Patients usually report that pain is more diffused and “nervy” feeling and commonly complain of muscle weakness. The tightness experienced in the blood vessels and fascial layers causes the nervous system to become very aggitated. To get the pain to reduce and to increase the range of motion of the neck the blood vessels and the deep fascia have to be treated. To treat these deep fascia layers you don’t have to “go deep”, aggressive treatments can actually irritate the problem more and cause the body to go into a deeper spasm. The last thing the body needs is any other over-stimulation from treatment. A more effective treatment will be aimed at lowering the agitation of the nervous system through the gentle release of the deep and middle cervical fascia. Once the nervous system has calmed down it will allow the range of motion to be restored.

With whiplash, often imaging (x-rays, MRI’s, CT scans) will not show much or anything. This is very frustrating for the person who is experiencing the pain and dysfunction. Most often than not, the best way to show the results of whiplash are thorough examination, WITH THE HANDS, looking for loss of mobility, limitation of movement, level of injury, and depth of restriction.

In conclusion, any sudden trauma, whether it be a fall, sports injury, traumatic brain injury or motor vehicle accident, can and will cause a level of whiplash in the body. This will cause a restriction that will need to be addressed. With all of these conditions the deepest layers will need to be released first in order to get the rest of the body to release. You will need to find a skilled therapist that has extensive training in this area. Only then can you start to correct dysfunctions in the body and work to strengthen and stabilize injured areas. If this is not addressed, the pain relief may be short lived. Remember the most effective treatments are pain free!

Synergy Healthcare offers physical therapy, occupational therapy in Spokane Valley, WA. Our highly trained therapists are ready to get you back on track fast! We try to prepare helpful articles that can help enrich your life. Have a question you want answered? Email us at info@synergyspokane.com or call at 509-413-1630 for more information. Comment below or give us a shout-out on Facebook– we love to hear whats on your mind!

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What Really Causes Migraines?

headachesMany people have tried to answer this question over the years. The most recent contender is Dr. Peter James Goadsby, and what he has to say is really turning heads. As mentioned in our previous article, migraines are different than tension or sinus headaches in that they aren’t caused my muscle tension or sinus congestion. Most people know that migraines can be triggered by things like bright lights, certain foods or hormonal imbalances- but is the trigger really the cause?

Common Theories

Up til now the theory has been that migraine headaches are an exaggerated pain response. When the brain perceives pain (ex. those bright lights) the blood vessels to the brain are enlarged and the nerve fibers coiled around them are compressed to make even more pain. Of course the mystery behind why some people react that way while the rest of us are migraine free has eluded researchers. What is Dr. Goadsby’s research bringing to the table?

Taking a Step Back

Researchers have been using brain scans to monitor what happens during a migraine for a while. Dr. Goadby’s research takes a step back in that  his focus is on what happens before the migraine. For the study researchers used mildly radioactive water to track brain activity while the subjects were given a well known migraine trigger. Interestingly before the onset of a painful migraine the subjects showed increased brain activity the hypothalmus, midbrain and pons- all areas that are active during a migraine. Also areas in the visual cortex and medulla that control light sensitivity and nausea were activated which implies that these symptoms might not be associated with the pain of a migraine but with the actual migraine process.

Conclusions

After looking at the brain scans researchers concluded that migraines  are not a response to pain, it is actually a brain disorder. What does this mean? Dr. Goadby believes that with this added insight they can start developing medications that will target the brain and underlying problem. If you suffer from migraines what can you do? First get to know your body and listen to what it says. Try to figure out what your migraine triggers are and avoid them. There are many different treatments for migraines, get the advice of your doctor and try to find something that works for you.

What can Synergy do?

While Synergy Healthcare therapists can’t write you prescription for medication we definitely have the skills to help! Shauna Burchett, OTR/L  specializes in craniosacral therapy.  This is a gentle technique that focuses on balancing the flow of cerebrospinal fluid in your brain and spine. Many people have found it effective in relieving chronic migraines- why not try it for yourself? We also have physical therapy that can address many components of migraine pain.

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